2020 Election Misinformation Tracking Center

Red-Rated Sites Spreading False Claims About the 2020 U.S. Election: 135 and Counting.

by Gabby Deutch | Last updated 11/27/2020 at 2:18 p.m.

Kendrick McDonald, Melissa Goldin, Evan Haddad, Shayna Elliot, Carly Wanna, John Gregory, Chandler Kidd, Sophia Tewa, Chine Labbe, Marie Richter, and Virginia Padovese contributed reporting.

As the 2020 U.S. election campaign comes to an end and attention turns to counting votes, misinformation about voting and the electoral process continues to flourish on social media. Follow the spread of this dangerous misinformation with NewsGuard’s new Election Misinformation Tracking Center.

Listed below are the news and information sites that NewsGuard has rated Red and identified as publishing materially false information about voting, the election, and the counting of ballots—misinformation that could sow distrust in the electoral process and in the election’s legitimacy.

Among the falsehoods these sites have published are that counting votes after Nov 3, 2020, is illegal, that Democrats are planning a violent coup, and that Republican state legislatures plan to override the will of their states’ voters by refusing to certify election results and urging the House of Representatives to decide the results of a contested election.

NewsGuard has also reported on the top election myths and debunked them with the facts. This report identifies who is spreading these myths.

This is not meant to be an exhaustive list of all sites that have published false or misleading election-related claims, nor is it a complete list of all election-related falsehoods on these websites.

For more information about the websites listed here—all of which NewsGuard has rated Red for failing to meet basic standards of credibility and transparency—download our news literacy browser extension, where you’ll find full credibility ratings with information about each site’s editorial standards and practices.

Researchers or others interested in using this list, including commercial users, should contact us for licensing information.

This is a work in progress that will be updated by NewsGuard throughout Election Night and in the days to follow, as election results are tallied. If you have come across a false story about voting or the election on a site we have not listed below, please report it here or contact us via our misinformation hotline.

Websites Publishing False Information About Voting and the Election

Click each link or scroll down to see more information about the website and an example of a false election claim it has published, with sites that published similar false claims appearing together. The sites are listed in alphabetical order by language, with networks that contain multiple sites appearing at the end. 

English

French

German

Italian


  • 100PercentFedUp.com, a conservative news and commentary site that has misstated facts and mixes news and opinion.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 3, 2020 article that claimed that “an ‘official sample ballot’ outside a Pennsylvania polling location has Democrats [sic] candidates shown, while Republican candidates are blurred out.”
    • The Facts: The 100PercentFedUp.com article cited a tweet that included an image of a large sign that states that it is a “Bucks County Democratic Official Sample Ballot” and shows bubbles for Democratic candidates filled in, while the names of Republican candidates are blurred out. However, the sign was not “official” material from the Pennsylvania Department of State’s Bureau of Commissions, Elections and Legislation, which oversees Pennsylvania’s electoral process. It clearly states that it was “paid for by the Bucks County Democratic Committee.”
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to a general address associated with 100PercentFedUp.com seeking comment on this false claim.

  • AmericanThinker.com, a website offering conservative analysis and commentary on political and cultural issues that has repeatedly published misleading and false articles.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 4, 2020 article that claimed that ballot counting was “suddenly shut down” in swing states including Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Nevada, and Arizona, because authorities needed “time alone with the ballots, away from prying eyes, so that what they bring forth would coincidentally of course, be a slew of all Biden ballots in every single case.” The article continued, “The counting suddenly shut down. Arizona went down a suspicious 90 minutes before the announcement that the state had flipped to Biden.…  In Pennsylvania’s case, they were caught on record as saying they wanted to keep the observers out.”
    • The Facts: Approximately 90 minutes after polls closed in Arizona, Fox News called the state for former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden. There is no evidence that counting “went down” or stopped after polls closed in the state.
      • To back its claim that Pennsylvania “wanted to keep observers out,” AmericanThinker.com cited a Nov. 3 tweet by Stephen Moore, a conservative commentator. Referring to Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, which includes the Democratic city of Pittsburgh, Moore tweeted: “Election officials blocking observation of absentee ballot processing. One official at site allegedly boasts that system is designed to block ballot observation. Source says observers fear integrity is compromise [sic].” In response to this tweet, Allegheny County tweeted: “No one is being blocked from anything and no one has reported anything or raised any concerns at the site.”
      • Although many swing states did not finish counting ballots on Election Night, with some pausing their counts, there is no evidence that ballot counting in any swing state was “suddenly shut down,” or that states paused their counting to  have “time alone” with ballots to make sure they went to Biden, as AmericanThinker.com claimed.
      • Ballot counting stopped in North Carolina on Election Night “because there were no more votes to count at that time,” North Carolina State Board of Elections Executive Director Karen Brinson Bell said at a press conference on Nov. 4, 2020. As of Nov. 4, 2020, there were 116,200 absentee ballots that had been requested, but had not yet been received by the North Carolina State Board of Elections, according to the board’s website. Absentee ballots that are received by Nov. 12 will still be counted, according to the Board of Elections.
      • Some counties in other swing states did pause their ballot counts on Election Night. For example, Fulton County, Georgia, suspended its absentee ballot count for four hours after a pipe burst where the count was taking place, according to multiple press reports. Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, suspended its mail-in voter count overnight on Nov. 3, 2020, to give workers time to rest, according to KDKA-TV, a CBS affiliate station in Pittsburgh.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to a general editor address affiliated with AmericanThinker.com seeking comment on this false claim.
  • A similar claim also appeared on:
    • ZeroHedge.com, a political and financial blog that frequently publishes false information and news stories sympathetic to Russia’s government.
      • In response to an email from NewsGuard inquiring about this false claim, Tyler Durden — the pseudonym of a prolific writer at the site — said that the article was “autosyndicated by Graham Summers of Phoenix Capital Research,” and ZeroHedge does not edit content that it syndicates. “We exercise no editorial content over autosyndicators,” Durden said.

  • Banned.video, a video website owned by Infowars founder Alex Jones that regularly shares conspiracy theories and false information, including about COVID-19 and the 2020 U.S. election.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 11, 2020, video that claimed that U.S. President Donald Trump had been re-elected in 2020. Speaking of President Trump, Jones said, “every media channel said that he wasn’t going to be elected president, but he was.” As evidence, Jones pointed in the video to a CNN election map that showed 14 “battleground” states as uncalled for either candidate. “Suddenly on CNN, all these states are back in play,” Jones said of the map.
    • The Facts:  On Nov. 7, 2020, four days after the general election, CNN, along with The Associated Press and many other major media outlets, projected Democrat Joe Biden as the winner of the 2020 presidential election. While President Trump filed lawsuits in several states that challenged the results, he has not been projected the winner. As of Nov. 13, 2020, Biden had been awarded 290 electoral votes, and approximately 77.7 million overall votes, to 232 electoral votes and approximately 72.4 million overall votes for President Trump, according to an ongoing count by the AP.
      • The CNN map that Jones pointed to was not a map of official election results, but instead appeared to be an interactive created by CNN that allowed users to build their own map. On Nov. 7, 2020, when CNN projected Biden as the winner, only four states on the network’s electoral map, not 14, as Jones claimed in the video, had remained uncalled.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to two emails sent to Infowars’ media inquiries address, seeking comment on this false claim. A NewsGuard voicemail to a media line for Infowars was also not answered.

The same claim appeared on 79Days.news and 2020ElectionCenter.com, two alternate domains for Banned.video that host the same content as Banned.video.


  • BeforeItsNews.com, a website that hosts user-submitted content and regularly publishes false information and conspiracy theories.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 4, 2020, article, republished from GellerReport.com, that claimed that Wisconsin had more votes cast in the 2020 presidential election than the state’s total number of registered voters. “This is direct evidence of fraud,” the site stated.
    • The Facts: The story claimed that Wisconsin had 3.1 million registered voters, which fact-checking website Snopes reported to be an outdated statistic from the 2018 midterm elections. According to the Wisconsin Election Commission, the state had 3.6 million active registered voters as of Nov. 1, 2020. As of 1 p.m. eastern time on Nov. 4, one hour after the BeforeItsNews.com was posted, 3.2 million votes had been cast in the state.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to the general email address listed on BeforeItsNews.com seeking comment on this false claim.

Similar claims also appeared on:

  • EpochTimes.de, the German edition of The Epoch Times, a conservative outlet founded by Chinese-Americans associated with Falun Gong, a Chinese spiritual practice that repeatedly promotes debunked conspiracy theories.
    • Epoch Times did not respond to a NewsGuard email, inquiring about the article cited above.

  • BillMoyers.com, a website containing the work of veteran television journalist Bill Moyers. The site has published inaccurate claims about the 2020 election.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Aug. 17, 2020, article that claimed that Postmaster General Louis DeJoy was “acting as a tool at the bidding of Donald J. Trump in a massive nationwide effort to help the president cheat: preventing people from easily and safely voting by mail during the pandemic.” The article accused the USPS of “removing, disassembling and in some cases destroying high volume sorting machines—671 of them to be scrapped this year, ten percent of the total—as well as removing actual mailboxes themselves” and concluded that politics motivated the removal of the mailboxes: “Coincidentally, Democratic Party strongholds seemed a particular target. And swing states.”
    • The Facts: The USPS routinely removes mailboxes when they are not needed in a certain area. Doing so is not a political tactic but a long-held USPS policy. Following the release of an August 2020 photo of a USPS mailbox in Oregon being removed, Post Office spokesperson Ernie Swanson told the Willamette Week, a Portland newspaper, that “The reason we’re doing it is because of declining mail volume.” In 2011, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper reported that the number of blue USPS mailboxes on U.S. streets had declined from 400,000 in 1985 to 160,000 in 2011, as Americans sent less physical mail and relied less on the blue public mailboxes. In a September 2020 ruling, Federal Judge Stanley Bastian issued an injunction temporarily halting the changes DeJoy put in place at the USPS, including the removal of mailboxes. “Although not necessarily apparent on the surface, at the heart of DeJoy’s and the Postal Service’s actions is voter disenfranchisement,” Bastian ruled. However, BillMoyers.com’s article was published several weeks before Bastian issued this opinion, and the court ruling did not back up the article’s claim that “swing states” were a “particular target” for the USPS’s policies.
    • Kristin Miller, senior editor and producer at BillMoyers.com, told NewsGuard that the site’s claims about the USPS were ultimately backed up by Judge Bastian’s ruling. “The bottom line is that the federal courts rejected DeJoy’s arguments that this was all just business as usual and acceptable during this pandemic election,” Miller said. “Accordingly, we respectfully request that the marker against our site be rescinded.” However, Miller did not comment on the site’s claim that the USPS targeted mailboxes in swing states, which has not been documented.

  • Bongino.com, the website of The Dan Bongino Show, a podcast hosted by conservative commentator and former Secret Service agent Dan Bongino, who regularly airs conspiracy theories and unproven claims.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 9, 2020, article that claimed that 450,000 ballots in five states that contained only a vote for Joe Biden and no other candidates are “statistically improbable,” and that including these votes in the count “made the difference between victory and defeat” in four of the five states: Wisconsin, Georgia, Arizona, and Pennsylvania. (The article also mentioned Michigan, but the number of supposed Biden-only ballots is not large enough to change the result of the state’s election.) 
    • The Facts: In every presidential election, millions of Americans vote only in the presidential race and none of the others, a practice known as “undervoting,” according to an analysis by The Washington Post. In Georgia, for example, the analysis found that in 2016, “the presidential race included more than 200,000 more votes than the state’s Senate race — nearly 5 percent of all voters in the state.” In Florida in 2016, The Washington Post wrote, “the gap was 120,000 votes.”
      • The Bongino.com article did not provide evidence for its claim that 450,000 ballots had been cast for Biden and no other candidates, citing only an unsupported claim by  Sidney Powell, an attorney on President Trump’s legal team. However, even if the article is correct that 450,000 ballots in the five states only included votes for Biden, this would not be “statistically improbable” or evidence of wrongdoing.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.
  • A similar claim also appeared on:
    • TheConservativeTreehouse.com, a conservative website that has published false claims about U.S. politics and the COVID-19 pandemic.
      • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.

  • Breitbart.com, a conservative news and commentary site that advocates for U.S. President Donald Trump’s nationalist and populist policies. The site has published false and misleading claims, including about COVID-19.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 3, 2020, article that suggested that voting in Philadelphia has faced widespread irregularities that amount to a Democratic attempt to “steal” the election. Breitbart claimed that “Democratic election officials are preventing poll watchers from entering polling locations across Philadelphia, as one video shows.” Breitbart cited a tweet that showed a man at a polling location who was initially prevented from entering by people who appear to be poll workers, but who election officials say was ultimately admitted. The Breitbart article included additional claims about other poll watchers being blocked from polling locations, but provided no evidence of the incidents. Breitbart also stated that “There also appear to be instances of illegal campaigning at various polling locations,” and included as evidence a photo of a political sign outside a polling location. 
    • The Facts: The fact that a single poll watcher was denied entry — but later permitted to enter — a polling location in Philadelphia does constitute a Democratic Party attempt to “steal” the election. According to ProPublica, Kevin Feeley, a spokesperson for the Philadelphia City Commissioners, acknowledged that a “mistake” was made and that the poll watcher in the video cited by Breitbart “was admitted” after the video was taken. At the same time, Feeley said that poll watchers are not being kept out of polling locations in the city. “Nonsense,” Feeley said. “That’s not happening.” In Pennsylvania, only one poll watcher per campaign may be present in a polling location at a time, and there is no evidence of widespread rejection of poll watchers from polling locations. Additionally, in Pennsylvania, electioneering material may be present 10 or more feet from polling locations. By the time Breitbart published its story, the Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office had already investigated the political sign posted outside a polling location — which Breitbart called evidence of “illegal campaigning” — and found it to be legal because the sign was posted more than 10 feet from the polling place.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to Breitbart Editor Alex Marlow seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.
  • A similar claim also appeared on:
    • BigLeaguePolitics.com, a conservative political site owned by a political consultant that has promoted false claims and unsubstantiated conspiracy theories.
      • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an inquiry submitted via a contact form on BigLeaguePolitics.com, seeking comment on this false claim.
    • IndependentSentinel.com, a conservative news and opinion site that has promoted false and unsubstantiated claims about the COVID-19 pandemic and the U.S. election.
      • In an email to NewsGuard, IndependentSentinel.com owner and editor-in-chief Maureen Dowling said, “Do you believe we must go along with whatever the NY Times and the Philly DA say? Please let me know. The partisanship in the media has ruined their credibility. We do not trust either source, but, of course, don’t discount them completely. We need more evidence and are looking at it.”
    • InformationLiberation.com, an anonymously owned conservative website that has published unsubstantiated claims about the COVID-19 pandemic and about the protests following the death of George Floyd. In response to an email from NewsGuard, InformationLiberation.com updated the article, which explains in an editor’s note that “this post has been updated to reflect a lack of clarity in some of the contested instances.” However, the article still claimed that Democrats were “caught cheating in Philly.”
      • InformationLiberation.com publisher Chris Menahan told NewsGuard in an email that he updated the story to include more context for what happened. “I have updated the story to highlight the ambiguity and lack of clarity in some of the Philly GOP’s posts and others’ claims and included statements from Philly officials and AG Shapiro’s office pushing back against them,” Menahan said.
    • TheWashingtonStandard.com, a site covering U.S. and world news from a conservative perspective that has published numerous false articles promoting discredited conspiracy theories.
      • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an inquiry submitted via a contact form on TheWashingtonStandard.com, seeking comment on this false claim.

  • BuffaloChronicle.com, a website covering New York State, U.S., and Canadian politics that has frequently published false and unsubstantiated conspiracy theories, often aimed at left-leaning politicians.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 6, 2020 article about the ballot-counting process in Pennsylvania that stated: “Election officials have prevented independent observers from sufficiently accessing the Philadelphia Convention Center, where the count is being conducted, despite a court order demanding that they be allowed within six feet of ballot processing.” BuffaloChronicle.com did not provide any evidence to support this claim. 
    • The Facts: There is no evidence that election observers have been denied access to the Philadelphia Convention Center, as BuffaloChronicle.com claimed.
      • According to the Pennsylvania Department of State, “only registered poll watchers can monitor the inside of polling locations, and members of the public must be 10ft away from the entrance and should not engage in activity that has the effect of intimidating voters.” Pennsylvania defines poll watchers as “registered voters in the county who have been appointed by a party or candidate to observe at the precinct.” The commonwealth also allows as overseers “registered voters of the precinct who may be appointed, upon petition, by all of the judges of the county Court of Common Pleas to supervise the election,” inside of polling locations.
      • The court order BuffaloChronicle.com referred to was apparently a Nov. 5, 2020, ruling by Judge Christine Fizzano Cannon of the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court, in  response to a complaint from the Trump campaign. Cannon held that “all candidates, watchers, or candidate representatives … be permitted to observe all aspects of the canvassing process within 6 feet, while adhering to all COVID-19 protocols, including, wearing masks and maintaining social distancing,” according to multiple press reports.
      • Philadelphia appealed the decision, according to multiple press reports, but there is no credible evidence to suggest that the city is not abiding by the court order.
      • The Pennsylvania Department of State said on its website that “some people were asked to leave the satellite Board of Election offices in Philadelphia,” but that “these offices are not polling places and poll watchers of any kind, from any party, are not permitted inside.”
      • Additionally, Philadelphia City Solicitor Marcel Pratt told The Philadelphia Inquirer: “…Many representatives of the Trump campaign have been given access to the Convention Center throughout the entire day and since Tuesday, just like other observers from other campaigns. The Board has set up a location from which candidates and party representatives, potentially in large  numbers, can easily view the room without impeding the operation.”
    • Matthew Ricchiazzi, the publisher of BuffaloChronicle.com, told NewsGuard in an email that the site “was told by multiple sources on the scene that observers are not being given meaningful access to observe the actual count the entire week with regard to allowing access within 6ft of the ballot processing.” He added that observers are “being kept 20 to 50 feet away from the ballots.” However, Ricchiazzi did not identify who these “multiple sources” were and did not support his claims with any other evidence.

  • CharismaNews.com, a news website covering politics, culture, and religion for Pentecostal Christians. The website has published false and misleading claims, including about the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • Example of False Election Claim:  Nov. 9, 2020, article that falsely claimed a “powerful supercomputer” called “Hammer” and an accompanying software program called “Scorecard” were used “to alter 3% of the votes when they [were] sent from local ballot offices to central counting systems.” The site added that “it is believed the technology altered the …outcome” of the Nov. 3, 2020, U.S. presidential election. 
    • The Facts: There is no evidence that the “Hammer” computer system or the “Scorecard” software exist, were used to alter votes, or had any impact on the U.S. election. The director of the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) called claims about this topic “nonsense” in a Nov. 7, 2020, tweet. In October 2020, a website called The American Report published claims about the existence of “Hammer” and “Scorecard” and their planned use in the election, and claimed that an ex-contractor named Dennis Montgomery built the system, without specifying when. According to The Daily Beast, Montgomery is “a former intelligence contractor and self-proclaimed whistleblower” with “a long history of making outlandish claims.”
    • NewsGuard emailed an address associated with the site seeking comment on the false story but did not receive a response.

Similar claims also appeared on:

  • CharlieKirk.com, a news site named for Charlie Kirk, founder of a national conservative student movement, that has published false and unsubstantiated claims about the 2020 elections and COVID-19.
    • CharlieKirk.com does not provide contact information for users. The website of Turning Point USA did not respond to two November sent through a general contact form on the site, seeking comment on this false claim. Kirk also did not respond to a message to his Facebook page.
  • ConservativeAngle.com, an anonymously operated website that republishes conservative news organizations’ content, including stories and headlines that misstate facts.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email account associated with ConservativeAngle.com seeking comment on this false claim.
  • ConservativeDailyPost.com, an anonymously run conservative website that has repeatedly published false and misleading claims, including about the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an inquiry submitted via a contact form on ConservativeDailyPost.com, seeking comment on this false claim.
  • CrashDebug.fr, a French-language anonymously operated website that has published discredited health claims about COVID-19 and the alleged dangers of vaccines.
    • In response to a NewsGuard inquiry sent to the email associated with the site, a person who only identifies himself as Folamour, and says that he is the owner of the website, said: “These machines are used everywhere in the world (not only in the United States), and if you had the slightest computing knowledge, and if you knew the extent of the infiltration of the NSA, you would know that, with a 99% chance, these loopholes exist, which is even logical, it’s a question of hegemony, in order to disrupt elections abroad. And it’s not only about Dominion systems.”
  • DavidIcke.com, a website named after former British football player David Icke that repeatedly publishes conspiracy theories, including Icke’s claim that the world is under the control of shape-shifting aliens.
    • In response to an email from NewsGuard inquiring about this false claim, Icke accused NewsGuard of “facilitating fascism” and said, “Thanks for confirming that the video is onto something. NewsGuard would not get involved if it wasn’t.
  • QActus.fr, a French-language, anonymously run website that publishes hoaxes and false information linked to the right-wing, conspiratorial movement QAnon.
    • QActus.fr did not respond to an email from NewsGuard seeking comment on this false claim.
  • Renovatio21.com, the website of an Italian anti-abortion Catholic nonprofit that has published false and unproven scientific and health information, including the false claim that vaccines are linked to autism.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.
  • Technocracy.news (and its Italian counterpart It.Technocracy.news), an anti-technology website that has repeatedly promoted false claims, including in stories about the debunked link between vaccines and autism and the virus that causes COVID-19.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to a message sent through Technocracy.news’s contact form seeking comment on this false claim.

  • ConservativeBrief.com, a conservative, pro-Trump website that has misstated facts and made unsubstantiated claims in articles and headlines.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Aug. 31, 2020, article that claimed that a “judge TOSSES 50,000 illegal ballots,” suggesting the existence of a massive voter fraud case in Iowa. 
    • The Facts: The Associated Press reported that Iowa District Court Judge Ian Thornhill ordered Linn County, Iowa, to invalidate 50,000 requests for absentee ballots, not actual ballots. The judge ruled that the ballot request forms had been improperly filled in by the Linn County Auditor prior to being sent to voters. There were no illegal ballots submitted, and no one was charged with a crime. Voters whose requests for a mail-in ballot were rejected could apply again or they could vote in person.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to a general email account associated with ConservativeBrief.com seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.

  • Conservative-Daily.com, a right-leaning news website that has advanced false claims and that urges readers to advocate for causes through an affiliated platform that transmits messages to members of Congress.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Aug. 16, 2020, article that claimed that living people are fraudulently voting on behalf of dead people in Michigan. “In Michigan so far this year, 846 ‘dead people’ tried to cast a ballot,” the article stated. “What I mean by that — since the dead cannot actually vote — is that 846 alive people tried to vote on behalf of someone who was already dead. These were literal cases of voter fraud.”
    • The Facts: According to data from Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, a Democrat, the people referred to in the article were alive when they voted absentee or voted early, then died before Election Day. As a result, Michigan’s secretary of state invalidated their ballots, as per state law. 
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to two emails sent to Joe Otto, Conservative-Daily.com’s founder, seeking comment on the false claim.

  • DavidHarrisJr.com, a conservative site run by health and media entrepreneur David Harris Jr. that has published false and misleading stories.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Oct. 12, 2020, article about a Texas Democrat arrested on charges of mail-in ballot fraud. “This is one of many voter fraud schemes discovered this year,” the article stated, claiming that “every perp was a Democrat.”
    • The Facts: Most voter fraud indictments do not provide information about the defendant’s political party, so it is impossible to determine the political affiliation of all people accused of voter fraud. But Republicans and Democrats have both faced voter fraud charges. For example, in 2019, North Carolina Republican operative Leslie McCrae Dowless was indicted for a ballot-harvesting scheme that resulted in a 2018 congressional race being voided in the state and re-run in a 2019 special election. In 2020, four East Texas Democrats were indicted on charges related to an absentee ballot fraud scheme.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to a message sent to Harris’s Facebook page seeking comment on DavidHarrisJr.com’s publication of a false election claim.

  • DCClothesline.com, a website providing conservative commentary that has published false information and misleading headlines.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Oct. 30, 2020, article that claimed that a recent decision by the U.S. Supreme Court allowed Pennsylvania and North Carolina to “counterfeit more fake ballots for nearly two weeks after the election.” 
    • The Facts: On Oct. 28, 2020, the Supreme Court voted to uphold rulings on mail-in voting extensions set forth by lower courts in Pennsylvania and North Carolina, Reuters reported. The decision allowed Pennsylvania to accept absentee ballots up to three days after Election Day, and allowed North Carolina to accept absentee ballots up to nine days after Election Day. The Supreme Court’s ruling does not allow those states to “counterfeit more fake ballots,” as DCClothesLine.com reported.
    • Dean Garrison, the owner of DCClothesLine.com, did not respond to a NewsGuard email seeking comment on the claim. 

  • DJHJMedia.com, a conservative political site run by David Harris Jr. that publishes false and unproven claims
    • Example of False Election Claim: Oct. 21, 2020, article claiming, without evidence, that “leftists created fake ‘Proud Boys’ website then sent emails to Democrats threatening them.”
    • The Facts: Democratic voters in several states reported receiving emails that appeared to be from the Proud Boys, a far-right group known for inciting violence. U.S. national security officials said that the emails were not sent by the Proud Boys, but they did not blame Democrats. Instead, officials said that Iranian actors sent the emails in an attempt to intimidate voters and damage President Trump. (The site later changed the article to reflect the Director of National Intelligence’s conclusion that Iran had been behind the emails. However, DJHJMedia.com did not include a correction or editor’s note explaining to readers what had been changed.)
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to a message sent to Harris’s Facebook page seeking comment on DJHJMedia.com’s publication of the false claim.

  • En-volve.com, a conservative news site that has published unsubstantiated conspiracy theories about U.S. politics.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 3, 2020, article that reported that Wendy Bell, a radio talk show host based in Pittsburgh, discovered that Pennsylvania’s Department of Health tried “to silence Republican voters in his state.” The story said that the state sent letters “ordering people who were potentially exposed to the coronavirus to stay home on Election Day.”
    • The Facts: The state of Pennsylvania sends letters to people who have been identified as “close contacts” of someone who has tested positive for coronavirus. However, these letters do not mention the 2020 election, nor are they aimed at Republicans. Rather, they tell people who have been in contact with a COVID-19 patient to quarantine for 14 days. April Hutcheson, a health department spokesperson, told FactCheck.org that “quarantine letters have not changed since we started issuing them” in spring 2020. Moreover, the state’s Department of Health does not disclose the names of close contacts, so poll workers would have no way of stopping these people from voting in-person, according to Hutcheson.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an inquiry submitted on the site’s Contact Us form or to an email sent to the site’s owner, seeking comment on this false claim.

  • EveryLegalVote.com, an anonymously run site that promotes the debunked narrative that the 2020 U.S. election featured massive fraud and features an election map that shows a win for Donald Trump, once supposedly fraudulent votes are discounted.
    • Example of False Election Claim: A map on the site’s homepage purports to show outcomes for the U.S. presidential election in each state. States that the site said were won by Democrat Joe Biden are shaded blue, states that were awarded to President Trump are shaded red, and states with “fraud detected” are shaded orange. All the states that the map identifies as having elections marred by fraud were won by Biden. Readers can click on a state and see its vote totals “with voter fraud” and “without voter fraud.” The site does not explain how it calculates the totals “without voter fraud.” For Pennsylvania — a state that Biden won by more than 80,000 votes, as of Nov. 19, 2020, according to state election officials — EveryLegalVote.com’s map shows President Trump winning by more than 1.3 million votes, once the allegedly fraudulent votes are removed.
    • The Facts: There is no evidence that fraud occurred at a large scale in the 2020 presidential election.  In a Nov. 12, 2020, statement, the Department of Homeland Security called the 2020 election “the most secure in American history,” stating, “There is no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes, or was in any way compromised.” In a lawsuit filed on Nov. 18, 2020, the Trump campaign argued that 1.5 million mail-in ballots in seven Pennsylvania counties “should not have been counted,” without providing evidence for why those votes were suspect. That same week, the Trump campaign lost a suit in Pennsylvania Supreme Court, which ruled against claims that Republican observers had not been given meaningful access to watch the vote-counting process.
      • Reporting on numerous lawsuits filed by The Trump campaign in Michigan, Wisconsin, Nevada, Arizona, Georgia, and Pennsylvania, The Washington Post said on Nov. 14, 2020, that nearly all the cases have been rejected or dismissed: “Nearly every GOP challenge has been tossed out. Not a single vote has been overturned,” The Washington Post reported.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to a spokesperson at Hamilton Strategies, the PR firm representing EveryLegalVote.com, seeking comment on this false claim.

  • FinishTheRace.com, a conservative website that has published false and misleading information, including about politics and COVID-19.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Sept. 7, 2020, article that claimed that in Michigan, counting votes past Nov. 3,  is “voter fraud” and amounts to a plan to “tamper with the 2020 Presidential election vote.”
    • The Facts: Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson has warned vote-counting is likely to take several days beyond Nov. 3, due to the high number of mail-in ballots. State law allows for mail-in votes to be counted after Nov. 3 if they arrive by 8 p.m. on Election Day.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to two emails sent to Eric Thompson, the site’s founder, regarding the site’s publication of false election claims.

  • GellerReport.com, a blog run by activist Pamela Geller that portrays Islam and its adherents in a negative light, and has published false claims about former U.S. President Barack Obama and COVID-19.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Sept. 25, 2020, article that reported  approximately 1,000 ballots were found in a California dumpster, which Geller called “voter suppression” and referred to as “the Democrats’ election strategy.”
    • The Facts: The envelopes found in the trash were not ballots. They were discarded empty vote-by-mail envelopes from the 2018 election, according to a tweet from the official Sonoma County, Cal., Twitter account.
    • In response to an email from NewsGuard inquiring about her site’s publication of election misinformation, Geller disputed that her article was inaccurate. “NewsGuard’s attempt to portray this as a false statement is a ridiculous attempt to hide the widespread evidence of voter fraud being committed on a large scale nationwide by Democrat operatives,” Geller said.

  • GlennBeck.com, the website of conservative media personality and radio host Glenn Beck, which often publishes unsubstantiated claims that advance conservative views.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Oct.10, 2020, article claiming that “members of the Obama Administration and State Department wrote the playbook for Color Revolution in the streets” and that the Democrats’ plan to overthrow the government “culminates on November 3rd.”
    • The Facts:  There is no evidence suggesting that Democratic officials, politicians, or activists have plans to respond with violence if President Trump wins reelection, or that they will advance a coup to unseat President Trump. Biden has routinely said that he will accept the results of the election, even if he loses, in contrast to President Trump.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to a Facebook message sent to Glenn Beck’s page seeking comment on GlennBeck.com’s publication of a false election claim.

  • GreatGameIndia.com, an India-based news and politics site that has promoted false and unsubstantiated health care conspiracy theories.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 14, 2020, article that claimed that evidence of illegal vote switching was housed on servers from the Barcelona-based software company Scytl, which were located in Frankfurt and seized by the U.S. military.
    • The Facts: According to The Associated Press, the U.S. army and Scytl have denied this claim. “We do not have servers or offices in Frankfurt,” a Scytl spokesperson told The AP. “The US army has not seized anything from Scytl in Barcelona, Frankfurt or anywhere else.” Scytl also said that it does not “tabulate, tally or count votes in the US.”
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to two emails sent to an email address affiliated with GreatGameIndia, seeking comment on this false claim.

  • GregPalast.com, the website of left-leaning journalist Greg Palast, which conducts original reporting on U.S. voter suppression and has distorted facts to advance an undisclosed left-leaning perspective.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Sept. 17, 2020, article on Palast’s NewsGuard Red-rated site that promoted unfounded conspiracy theories about election results. “I expect Florida will have 6 million mail-in ballots,” the article stated. “The GOP-controlled Florida Legislature will say, we can’t count them in time, so we’re not going to certify the election” as part of a ploy to send the decision to the U.S. House, who under the 12th Amendment decides the president if no majority is reached in the electoral college.
    • The Facts: There is no evidence to suggest that the Florida legislature will refuse to certify the state’s election results. At a rally, President Trump mentioned the possibility of the election having to be decided by Congress, but stated that he does not want that to happen. “I don’t want to end up in the Supreme Court and I don’t want to go back to Congress either, even though we have an advantage,” he said at a September rally in Pennsylvania.
    • GregPalast.com did not respond to an email from NewsGuard seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.

  • InfoWars.com, a far-right website run by radio host Alex Jones that has reported that 9/11 was orchestrated by the U.S. government and the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School was a hoax, among other falsehoods.
    • Example of False Election Claim: In a Nov. 5, 2020, article, Infowars.com quoted the false claim of former U.S. State Department employee Steve Pieczenik that legitimate mail-in ballots contained watermarks in order to catch Democrats committing voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election. “In order to ensure the election remained fair, POTUS devised an advanced trap,” the article stated. “Hidden, trackable watermarks were allegedly put onto ballots so they could be verified if necessary.” Infowars also cited a February 2020 patent application filed by the U.S. Postal Service, which the website reported “involved blockchain tracking tech embedded into mail-in ballots.” The article concluded, “If this plays out the way Pieczenik has described, the nation could be in store for the most illuminating revelation of corruption in its history.”
    • The Facts: The federal government does not produce ballots. According to fact-checking websites PolitiFact and FactCheck.org, that task is typically handled by printing companies contracted by state and local governments. The patent application cited by Infowars was related to voting, but it did not seek to embed tracking codes on mail-in ballots. Instead, the Postal Service sought to send voters a unique code by mail that could be used to verify their identity and allow for secure online voting. The application filed with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office was not approved before the Nov. 3, 2020, election.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with InfoWars.com, seeking comment on this false claim.

Similar claims also appeared on:

  • DataBaseItalia.it, a news and information site that has published false content on the 2020 coronavirus outbreak and other topics. The site also shares QAnon conspiracy theories.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.
  • GNews.org, a site covering China and the U.S. from an undisclosed anti-communist perspective that promotes conspiracy theories, including about COVID-19. The site publishes content in English and Chinese.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with GNews.org seeking comment on this false claim.

  • JudicialWatch.org, the website of a conservative nonprofit legal foundation and government watchdog, which has published inaccurate and misleading content and does not disclose its sources of financing.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 9, 2020, article that claimed that “It is not normal for multiple states to be counting presidential votes for days after Election Day. And it raises significant concerns about the validity of post-election counts.” The article added, “Changing results after Election Day raises significant legal and constitutional concerns.”
    • The Facts: It is not uncommon for election results to not be certified, or made official, on Election Day. According to Ballotpedia, “certification is the process by which the results of an election are made official,” a process conducted by state election officials. Each state sets a different certification deadline, ranging from Nov. 5 in Delaware to Dec. 8 in several other states. Counting votes after Election Day is legally required, if those votes were cast lawfully and mail-in ballots were received by the deadline set by each state. Simply because a candidate is leading the vote count on the night of the election does not mean that he or she will ultimately be declared the winner.
      • In the 2020 U.S. presidential election, Democrat Joe Biden appeared to have fewer votes in several states (including Georgia, Michigan, and Pennsylvania) on Election Night, before he later surpassed President Donald Trump once all mail-in and early votes were tallied. This does not amount to anyone “changing results,” as Judicial Watch claimed. The votes were all cast on or before Nov. 3, but some votes were counted after that date. 
      • Many states saw an increase in mail-in voting due to voters’ fears of the coronavirus pandemic. Because of this increase in mail ballots, many voting administrators and state officials cautioned before the election that they expected the counting of ballots in 2020 to extend beyond Election Day.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to Judicial Watch president Tom Fitton, seeking comment on this false claim. 

  • LawEnforcementToday.com, a website providing news and information for law enforcement professionals that mixes news and opinion and does not issue corrections.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Oct. 15, 2020, article that claimed that the distribution of 13,000 Utah ballots, which were erroneously sent with no signature line on the return envelope, was a “cheat-by-mail scheme.”
    • The Facts: The Salt Lake Tribune reported that the Sanpete County Clerk quickly learned of the mistake, which was a printing error, and immediately put information online explaining to voters how to correctly submit their ballot. There was no evidence that the mistake was part of a voter fraud scheme.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email associated with Law Enforcement Today page seeking comment on the site’s publication of false election claims.

  • LeSalonBeige.fr, an ultraconservative French blog that has published false and unsubstantiated claims, including misinformation about vaccines and the COVID-19 pandemic. 
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 10, 2020, article titled “Coup d’état in the United States,” which claimed that Democrats falsified mail-in ballots before the election by “sending in all Democratic States millions of mail-in ballots which, for many of them, were collected by Democratic activists who turned them into ballots for the left-wing candidate.”  LeSalonBeige.fr also wrote that on Nov. 3, Democrats “added the number of ballots needed for Donald Trump to lose.”
    • The Facts: There is no evidence that Democrats altered collected ballots in favor of Biden. According to the National Council of State Legislatures, a nonpartisan organization that researches issues of interest to state officials, ballot collection is legal in many states. These states have a variety of laws relating to the practice of ballot collection. Some states, like Arizona, only allow a family member, caregiver, or person who lives with the voter to turn in the voter’s ballot. Other states, including Montana, allow non-family members to return people’s ballots, but place a limit on the number of ballots a person may return. It is illegal for the people who collect ballots to change the person’s vote.  In a Nov. 12, 2020, statement, the Department of Homeland Security called the 2020 election “the most secure in American history,” stating, “There is no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes, or was in any way compromised.”  
    • When asked about this false claim, Le Salon Beige publishing director Guillaume de Thieulloy told NewsGuard in an email: “I don’t really see what is unique about discussing fraud in this American election. Most of the American media are talking about it – often to downplay the consequences, but you only downplay the consequences of something that happened. Many judicial institutions are working on it. The U.S. Attorney General has explicitly stated that these investigations are warranted…. Moreover, you question me as if Le Salon Beige had to uphold an impartiality that no one would think of asking from the ‘mainstream’ media. In this case, Guy Millière’s article is clearly pro-Trump, the author is known for it, he notoriously works for a conservative think tank in the United States and there is no ambiguity about his commitment. Meanwhile, Le Salon Beige has never claimed to be neutral – especially on the question of the defense of innocent lives which was one of the main stakes of this election (even if the French media did not think it was worth covering).”

  • ImolaOggi.it, a right-leaning news website that publishes false and misleading content to advance nationalist and anti-immigrant views. 
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 11, 2020, article, republished from Italian website LiberoQuotidiano.it that claimed that the U.S. political news site Real Clear Politics had “taken away” Pennsylvania, or reversed its determination that Democrat Joe Biden had won that state in the U.S. presidential election. The author, after explaining that U.S. President Donald Trump had claimed electoral fraud occurred in Pennsylvania, stated, “There is a first sign that gives hope to the Republican president’s circle: the bipartisan site Real Clear Politics, which specializes in electoral numbers, has taken away Pennsylvania (one of the key presidential states) from Biden, keeping the election on hold. Not a sign to be underestimated.” On Nov. 26, 2020, LiberoQuotidiano.it removed the article and published a new article correcting the false claim and apologizing to readers. However, ImolaOggi.it has not made any corrections.
    • The Facts: RealClearPolitics.com never withdrew a projection for Pennsylvania in favor of Biden, according to Tom Bevan, the co-founder and president of the site. Bevan tweeted on Nov. 9, 2020, “We never called Pennsylvania and nothing has changed,” in response to a YouTube video and tweets by supporters of President Trump, including personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, that stated that the political website had withdrawn its election call. As of Nov. 9, 2020, the website’s electoral map had Pennsylvania shaded gray, to signify that the state’s winner had not been projected. As of Nov. 18, 2020, Real Clear Politics had changed its map to reflect a Biden win in Pennsylvania.  
    • In response to an email from NewsGuard inquiring about the site’s publication of this false claim, the site explained that it had republished the article from LiberoQuotidiano.it, and urged NewsGuard to ask them about it, rather than ImolaOggi.it. :“Why don’t you go to the SOURCE which, in this case, is LiberoQuotidiano.it … And of course if they rectify, we will rectify too. If they delete it, we will delete it too.”

  • LouderWithCrowder.com, a website named after conservative comedian Steven Crowder that often misstates facts to discredit Democrats and liberal causes. 
    • Example of False Election Claim: In a Nov. 4, 2020, video posted on the site, titled “EXCLUSIVE! Possible Voter Fraud In Michigan? Lawyer Captures Video!,” Crowder played footage filmed by a woman named Kellye SoRellye, a member of the group Lawyers for Trump. The video showed a man loading a box out of a truck onto a wagon outside Detroit’s TCF Center, a convention center where election workers were counting ballots. Crowder described the video as showing “a guy bringing it in a red wagon, these ballots.” SoRellye told Crowder that the box was similar to ones carrying ballots that she “had seen and been watching and monitoring.” Crowder or the article did not explain how the video showed “possible voter fraud,” as the headline claimed.
    • The Facts: The box filmed by SoRellye did not contain ballots, but the gear of a  cameraman for Detroit’s WXYZ-TV, the TV station reported in a Nov. 5 article. “The ‘ballot thief’ was my photographer,” tweeted WXYZ reporter Ross Jones. “He was bringing down equipment for our 12-hour shift.”  
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to a message sent through LouderWithCrowder.com’s contact form seeking comment on this false claim.

  • NationalFile.com, a website that has repeatedly published conspiracy theories and other false information and does not disclose its agenda.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Oct. 5, 2020, article that claimed that the nonprofit Center for Tech and Civic Life is “a far-Left ballot harvesting group” that is “actively harvesting ballots.” The article said that an ongoing lawsuit against the nonprofit raises “concerns of illegal ballot harvesting.”
    • The Facts: There is no evidence that the Center for Tech and Civic Life (CTCL) has ever supported or been involved in a ballot harvesting scheme. Ballot harvesting refers to the illegal practice of political operatives being paid to collect ballots from vulnerable people like the elderly and disabled, and changing the person’s vote so that it supports the political operative’s party. The Center for Tech and Civic Life is a Chicago-based nonprofit whose stated goal is to “connect Americans with the information they need to become and remain civically engaged, and ensure that our elections are more professional, inclusive, and secure,” according to the group’s website. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg donated $250 million to the organization in 2020 to “support a variety of efforts by local jurisdictions to expand voter access,” according to a press release. The organization provides technical support to local jurisdictions and provides voters with information about candidates and issues. A lawsuit filed by the conservative Wisconsin Voters Alliance said that the CTCL grants to cities in Wisconsin are “constitutionally impermissible public-private partnerships that give an appearance of undue influence on a federal election,” according to The Associated Press. The lawsuit did not involve claims of ballot harvesting.  
    • In an unsigned email, NationalFile.com told NewsGuard that the article was updated to add more information about the lawsuit.

  • NOQReport.com, a California-based conspiracy-oriented website that has published false information.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 5, 2020, article that claimed that William Bradley, a man who died in 1984, voted for Joe Biden, which the site said was an example of how “the results of this election are so unquestionably bogus.”
    • The Facts: There is no evidence that anyone tried to fraudulently vote on behalf of Bradley or other dead people in Michigan. It appears this was a recording error. The New York Times reported that William T. Bradley, the son of the man who died in 1984, said that he returned an absentee ballot. However,  Michigan’s voting database shows that the younger Bradley had not voted, and his dead father had. “The city appeared to have mistakenly recorded the vote of William T. Bradley under his dead father, who had the same name and ZIP code,” The New York Times reported.
      • In a statement that did not specifically mention Bradley, the Michigan Secretary of State’s Office said it is possible that the state’s voter registry will link a ballot to a deceased family member with the same name. “On rare occasions, a ballot received for a living voter may be recorded in a way that makes it appear as if the voter is dead,” said the statement from the Secretary of State. “This can be because of voters with similar names, where the ballot is accidentally recorded as voted by John Smith Sr when it was actually voted by John Smith Jr; or because of inaccurately recorded birth dates in the qualified voter file; for example, someone born in 1990 accidentally recorded as born in 1890.”
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to two emails sent to James Rucker, the site’s editor-in-chief and apparent owner, seeking comment on this false claim. 

Similar claims also appeared on:

  • ConservativeDailyNews.com, a political website that has published false and unsubstantiated information about the 2020 elections and COVID-19.
    • Richard Mitchell, the site’s founder and editor in chief, did not respond to two emails from NewsGuard seeking comment on this false claim.
  • Fr.SputnikNews.com, the French language website of Russian state-owned news agency Sputnik.
    • Fr.SputnikNews.com did not immediately respond to an email NewsGuard sent to an email address associated with the site seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.
  • Fr.TheEpochTimes.com, the French edition of The Epoch Times, a conservative newspaper that has promoted false claims and debunked conspiracy theories while mixing opinion with news to advance its political agenda.
    • Ludovic Genin, editor in chief of Epoch Times France, did not respond to a NewsGuard email seeking comment on this false claim.
  • IlPrimatoNazionale.it, the site of Il Primato Nazionale, a monthly newsmagazine connected to the Italian neo-fascist movement Casapound that frequently publishes false and misleading content.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.

  • OANN.com, the website for conservative cable news channel One America News Network, whose stories regularly distort facts to advance an undisclosed conservative agenda.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 11, 2020, video that claimed that a voting software program run by a company called Dominion Voting Systems experienced widespread “glitches” that deleted votes for President Trump or switched Trump votes to Democratic candidate Joe Biden.
    • The Facts: According to a Nov. 12, 2020, statement from the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency, a federal agency that oversees U.S. election security, “There is no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes, or was in any way compromised.” Dominion Voting Systems also said in a statement to The Associated Press that it “denies claims about any vote switching or alleged software issues with our voting systems.” Additionally, The AP reported that Ellen Lyon, spokesperson for the Pennsylvania Department of State, said in an email that there was “no factual basis” for the claim that votes were switched from President Trump to Biden in Pennsylvania. The Michigan Department of State also told The AP that vote tabulating errors, which were corrected, were the result of human error, not Dominion software.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an inquiry submitted via a contact form on OANN.com, inquiring about this false claim.

Similar claims also appeared on:

  • Cogiito.com, a French website that translates articles about alternative medicine from unreliable websites, including false claims regarding Covid-19 and vaccine safety.
    • Cogiito.com did not respond to a NewsGuard email seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.
  • FreieWelt.net, a German right-wing, anti-immigration website covering national and international politics that does not disclose its agenda or issue corrections.
    • FreieWelt.net did not respond to a NewsGuard email, inquiring about the article cited above.
  • Geopolintel.fr, a French-language website covering globalism and geopolitical issues that has promoted debunked conspiracies and false claims, including about the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • Geopolintel.fr did not respond to a NewsGuard email seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.
  • LaCrunaDellAgo.net, the website of Italian blogger Cesare Sacchetti, which has frequently published false and misleading information on the 2020 coronavirus pandemic, as well as unsubstantiated conspiracy theories.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.
  • LesObservateurs.ch, a nationalist Swiss website that frequently publishes false content and unproven conspiracy theories, including about the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • Uli Windisch, editors-in-chief of LesObservateurs.ch, did not respond to an email from NewsGuard seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.
  • MadWorldNews.com, a conservative opinion website publishing stories on politics, religion, gun rights, and other topics. The site has published misleading information, including about COVID-19.
    • NewsGuard emailed Corey Pepple, the site’s owner, seeking comment on this story but did not receive a response.
  • PI-News.net, a self-described “politically incorrect” German website that promotes far right-wing conspiracy theories and publishes anti-Islam content. The site has repeatedly published distorted content.
    • PI-News did not respond to a NewsGuard email, inquiring about the article cited above.

  • PacificPundit.com, an anonymously operated far-right website that publishes false content and conspiracy theories.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 8, 2020, article that falsely claimed 132,000 ballots cast in the 2020 U.S. presidential election from Fulton County, Ga., which includes Atlanta, had been “flagged” because of “change of address” irregularities, and that the ballots were therefore “highly likely ineligible to vote.” The site did not explain what “flagged” means.
    • The Facts: Officials in the Fulton County, Ga., Department of External Affairs told the fact-checking outlet Lead Stories, “Fulton County is aware of allegations of 132,000 ballots being ‘flagged.’ These claims are simply false and baseless. Certain news organizations have circulated this information without contacting Fulton County for confirmation.” Lead Stories also reported that a county spokesperson stated, “From what we can tell, the entire claim is false.”
    • NewsGuard  emailed the site’s owner, Dave Klassix, seeking comment on this false claim but did not receive a response.

A similar claim also appeared on:

  • RFAngle.com, a conservative website affiliated with the co-founder of a pro-Trump student organization, that has published unsubstantiated claims.
    • NewsGuard used a contact form on the site to seek comment on its false story but did not receive a response.

  • PalmerReport.com, a website publishing highly opinionated and speculative analysis of U.S. politics from a liberal point of view.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Oct. 16, 2020, article that suggested that Republican warnings about voter fraud mimicked Soviet Russia and Nazi Germany: “‘Guarding against voter fraud’ was how Nazi Germany, the former Soviet Union, Vladimir Putin and other practitioners of demagoguery rigged elections,” the article claimed, adding, “That the president of the United States should be calling upon citizens to perform such acts is nothing short of disgraceful, and justly illegal in many states.”
    • The Facts: It is historically inaccurate to claim that Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin used fear of “voter fraud” to rig elections. In the last “free” election before the Nazi party rose to power in 1933, Hitler used “extraordinary measures of terror” to convince voters to support him, the German news site DW wrote in 2013. Hitler assumed power in 1933 and cancelled elections altogether after 1938. In Soviet Russia, despite the promise of contested elections in the Soviet Constitution, voters were often given the name of only one candidate on their ballots, according to the Wilson Center. These authoritarian regimes did not invoke fears of voter fraud; they had complete power.
    • In response to an email from NewsGuard inquiring about the site’s publication of false election claims, Palmer Report defended the articles. “Palmer Report’s article is 100% factually accurate and we stand by it,” the site wrote in an unsigned email.

  • Patriote.info, a website that republishes articles from other French news sources, sometimes including false information and conspiracy theories promoting far-right nationalist ideas.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 4, 2020, article that shared a tweet with a photo of a man carrying a ballot box to his car, claiming that “this image, which was taken by the Philadelphia Republican party, shows a poll worker taking ballots to his car. This is clear cut fraud in action.”
    • The Facts: The Philadelphia City Commissioners Office told Reuters that the man was a Board of Elections employee who was delivering the ballot box as part of his job.
    • Patriote.info did not respond to a NewsGuard message sent via the site’s contact form on the website, seeking comment on this false claim.

  • Politicalite.com, a website providing conservative-leaning news and commentary about British and American politics. The site frequently publishes dubious and often damaging claims based on anonymous sources.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 4, 2020, article that claimed that “TRUMP Voters in Arizona have said they were ‘duped’ into using Sharpie markers on their ballots in the Presidential Election on November 3rd, leading to the votes being invalidated at counts,” and that this amounted to “stealing democracy.”
    • The Facts: Arizona’s Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, a Democrat, said that ballots marked with sharpies will be counted, according to Fox 10, a Fox affiliate in Phoenix. There is no evidence that only voters of one party were told to use Sharpies, nor is there evidence of ballots marked with sharpies being invalidated.
    • In response to an email from NewsGuard inquiring about this false claim, Politicalite editor-in-chief Jordan James wrote, “I have no comment to give fake bastards.”
  • Similar claims also appeared on:
    • Breizh-Info.com, a far-right French website that publishes news content primarily covering the Brittany region of France and that has promoted debunked conspiracy theories and other false claims. 
      • Asked about this false election claim, which was published under the headline “Youtube censors a video that summarizes fraud and anomalies that have plagued the U.S. election since Tuesday,” Breizh-Info co-founder Yann Vallerie told NewsGuard in an email: “As the title suggests, we were talking about the censorship of a video by YouYube, not the content of that video. Then, the readers are old enough to know what is true, what is false…  You’d be smart to pretend to tell the truth about these American elections.”
    • Brighteon.com, a video-sharing website allowing anyone to post content with minimal vetting that is rife with conspiracy theories and other false information.
      • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to two email addresses affiliated with Brighteon.com seeking comment on this false claim.
    • Compact-Online.de, the website of Compact, a monthly German magazine that publishes false content to advance right-wing views of the AfD party, along with Russian disinformation.
      • Compact Online did not respond to a NewsGuard email, inquiring about the article cited above.
    • RushLimbaugh.com, the website for the Rush Limbaugh Show, a syndicated radio program hosted by the conservative political commentator, which often airs false claims and conspiracy theories.
      • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with RushLimbaugh.com, seeking comment on this false claim.

  • Profession-Gendarme.com, a French website that started out publishing news about France’s national gendarmerie police but now promotes conspiracy theories and misinformation, including false claims about COVID-19.
    • Example of False Election Claim: A November 2020 article that claimed that a study by the right-wing U.S. site Judicial Watch “shows that 1.8 million voters are ghost voters in 29 states, highlighting the election’s ‘dirty’ nature.” (“L’étude de Judicial Watch qui démontre qu’un 1,8 millions d’électeurs sont fantômes dans 29 États accentuant le caractère ‘sale’ des élections”).
    • The Facts: There is no evidence that some U.S. counties registered “ghost voters” on their lists, meaning that they had more registered voters than eligible adults. According to elections experts interviewed by U.S. fact-checking site Snopes, Judicial Watch based its study on a misleading comparison between voter registration data from state officials and data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Snopes wrote that these figures “do not prove the existence of ‘ghost voters’ in counties. Rather, the two datasets make for problematic comparisons because of the differences in the time frame they were taken, the differing purposes of each set of data, and the method by which they are collected.”
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to Ronald Guillaumont, the site’s editor-in-chief, seeking comment on this false claim.

Similar claims also appeared on:

  • Deutsch.RT.com, the German website of RT, a Russian government disinformation and propaganda effort previously known as Russia Today.
    • RT Deutsch did not respond to a NewsGuard email, inquiring about the article cited above.
  • DisSept.com, a French website that promotes hoaxes and conspiracy theories linked to the conspiracy movement known as QAnon, including misinformation about the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • DisSept.com did not respond to a NewsGuard email seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.
  • Philosophia-Perennis.com, a right-wing, anti-Muslim German blog with ties to the nationalist AfD party. The site has repeatedly published false content and does not run corrections.
    • Asked about this false claim, Philosophia-Perennis’ owner, David Berger, wrote in an article on the site, “Our article merely quotes an article from the Washington Post” — in fact, the article appeared in the Washington Times, not the Washington Post — “which warned in advance of dirty elections and 18 million ‘ghost voters’ in the US election, referring to a report by Judicial Watch. Other voices also have their say in the article. By linking the articles to different positions, we gave our readers the opportunity to form their own opinions.”
  • ResistanceRepublicaine.eu, an anti-Islam French site that has published false and misleading claims about Muslims and immigrants in France, as well as misinformation about the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • In response to a NewsGuard inquiry about this false claim, the site wrote in an unsigned email: “The President-elect of the United States, until the handover of power in January, is Donald Trump; the press and the leftist pseudo fact-checkers, which you are a part of, have the presumptuousness to lie and unilaterally declare a different president, while the official announcement has not taken place and, icing on the cake, there is an appeal for fraud… ‘Snopes’ is just as little credible and objective as Le Monde’s Décodeurs, Libé and NewsGuard.’ However, Libé and Le Monde are dubbed by Newsguard as publishing reliable information, ah! ah! ah! And you think I’m going to be held accountable to you? So continue to treat people like 5-year-olds who can be manipulated and who must be re-educated so that they conform to the dominant ideology. Are you paid by Soros?” 
  • Unzensuriert.at, a right-wing news site covering Austria and Germany, which has published false content that advances the Freedom Party of Austria’s views.
    • Asked about the article cited above, the Unzensuriert editorial office told NewsGuard in an email, “We wrote what ‘an American online newspaper’ reported and linked to that. It is not up to us to defend the study on which the report is based.”

  • PublishedReporter, a Florida-based news site that has published false claims and conspiracy theories, including about COVID-19.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 8, 2020, article that claimed that in the U.S. presidential election, Democrats’ “election fraud is blatantly obvious and would be easy to expose and counter, were it not for the media’s collusion. Tens of thousands of ballots mysteriously appearing at 4am, nearly all for Biden, overtaking Trump’s dramatic lead in multiple swing states?” The article also asserted that “the Dems and the enormously powerful globalist/Marxist cabal behind them, are trying to overturn the election that Trump clearly won. This time, they’re seeking to oust him not by cooking up more phony scandals, but through massive election fraud.”
    • The Facts: No evidence has emerged of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 U.S. presidential election. As the Financial Times reported in November 2020, “There has not been evidence of significant voter fraud in this year’s election or to support Mr Trump’s allegations of a conspiracy to determine the result.”
      • There are multiple reasons that Democrat Joe Biden’s lead in several U.S. states became apparent only later in the vote count after the Nov. 3, 2020, election. Elections officials said that many more voters cast mail-in or absentee ballots, in part because of voters’ concerns about casting ballots in person during the COVID-19 pandemic. State officials had said before Election Day that they had expected the counting of ballots to extend beyond that day.
    • In response to an inquiry from NewsGuard regarding this false claim, John Colascione, the site’s publisher, said that he thought fraud would emerge at some point. “Personally, I think there is probably some evidence out there as far as widespread voter fraud, but even if there is not, I am pretty sure that this is because we never before mailed every registered voter a ballot automatically. They had to be requested and I am pretty sure you had to have a reason. For the first time, there are ballots being sent everywhere automatically and people steal them,” Colascione said. While some states do regularly send mail-in ballots to voters, the practice is not the same in every state, and the practice did not begin “for the first time” this year, as Colascione said.

Similar claims also appeared on:

  • ComeDonChisciotte.org, a self-described Italian “alternative news” website that often publishes conspiracy theories about 9/11 and the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.
  • EgaliteEtReconciliation.fr, a far-right French website that often publishes false information, including about the COVID-19 pandemic. The site’s founder, Alain Soral, has been convicted of inciting racial hatred.
    • Soral did not respond to a NewsGuard message sent to him via a contact form on the website, seeking comment on this false claim.
  • JournalistenWatch.com, a German website that has relied on misleading or unsubstantiated claims to back an undisclosed far-right viewpoint in its coverage of journalism and of national and international news.
    • Asked about the article cited above, freelance journalist Daniel Matissek wrote on behalf of JournalistenWatch that the reference to “ghost voters” is “recognizably a personal conclusion of the author, which – based on the information available at the time of publication – was apparent, and which as such was probably more than made clear by the double use of the verb ‘seem.’ An existence of ghost voters was NOT claimed by us as a fact, it was only deemed obvious.”
  • LaNuovaBQ.it, a Catholic news site that has published false information to advance right-wing opinions.
    • In an email to NewsGuard, the author of the article said: “Several lawsuits are underway in Michigan to ascertain this and other anomalies, so we should wait at least the response of the US judiciary before talking about ‘misleading news.’”
  • MaurizioBlondet.it, the personal website of Maurizio Blondet, an Italian journalist who has promoted conspiracy theories about health and politics.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.
  • ScienceFiles.org, a German website covering politics, health, and gender that has published false claims about climate change and the COVID-19 virus.
    • ScienceFiles did not respond to a NewsGuard email, inquiring about the article cited above.

  • RedState.com,  a right-leaning news and opinion website that has published false and misleading information, including about the COVID-19 pandemic, and regularly mixes news and opinion.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 8, 2020, article that claimed that “we’ve witnessed the theft of an election … a blatant, above-board, in-your-face theft of an election.” As evidence of this alleged fraud, the article claimed that “Election workers are known to have altered absentee ballots to make them valid,” adding, “We are hearing anecdotes of GOP ballots being systematically destroyed.”
    • The Facts: There is no evidence that the 2020 presidential election was stolen, or that the results are tantamount to “the theft of an election.”  A report published by the Organization of American States, an international organization that served as a nonpartisan election observer monitoring the U.S. election, did not find evidence of any irregularities or systematic fraud, The Wall Street Journal reported.
      • Moreover, election workers altering voters’ ballots is not evidence of fraud or “theft of an election;” it is a normal part of the vote-counting process. According to the federal Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), election workers can mark or otherwise alter a ballot in order to ensure it is counted. “In some circumstances, elections officials are permitted to ‘duplicate’ or otherwise further mark cast ballots to ensure they can be properly counted,” CISA wrote on a webpage devoted to debunking rumors about the election. According to CISA, this might occur when “some ballots cannot be read by a ballot scanner due to issues such as damage or misprinting.” Additionally, there is no evidence that Republican ballots — or any ballots — are being “systematically destroyed.” This claim is not part of the ongoing Trump campaign litigation in several swing states that voted for Joe Biden. 
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.

A similar claim also appeared on:

  • LeCourrier-du-Soir.com, a French-language website covering French and international news that has published false and unsubstantiated claims, including about COVID-19.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site seeking comment on this false claim.

  • Revolver.news, an anonymously run right-leaning news site that calls itself “the new Drudge Report,” which has published conspiracy theories and false information.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Sept. 9, 2020, article that named Norm Eisen, who served as counsel for the Democrats on the U.S. House Judiciary Committee, as the “central operative” in the “color revolutions,” protests movements that the site called “coordinated efforts of government bureaucrats, NGOs, and the media to oust President Trump.”
    • The Facts: There is no evidence to back up the theory that a “deep state” comprising government officials, including Eisen, has sought to sabotage Donald Trump’s presidency and “oust” him.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to Revolver.news seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.

Similar claims also appeared on:

  • ConservativeFiringLine.com, a conservative politics site that publishes conspiracy theories and false information.
    • In an email to NewsGuard, ConservativeFiringLine.com owner Joe Newby disputed the characterization of this article as false. “You may disagree with the author’s conclusions, and that is your right. That does not make the piece false. You cannot deny that there has been a concerted effort by the left, funded in part by George Soros, to undermine the president and interfere with the 2020 election,” Newby said. “I know exactly what your organization is all about. It is not uncommon for your group to cherry-pick bits and pieces of a particular post out of the more than 15,000 we have published to try to make your case.”
  • HO1.us, a website that regularly promotes far-right conspiracy theories in French and English, including false claims about the COVID-19 virus.
    • HO1.us did not respond to a NewsGuard email seeking comment on this false claim.

  • TeaParty.org, a conservative news website promoting the Tea Party political movement. TeaParty.org republishes stories from unreliable sources and has promoted conspiracy theories.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Sept. 3, 2020, article that claimed that “counterfeit mail-in ballots can be mixed into the results that swing the election to one candidate, i.e. Biden” and speculated that “mail-in votes for another candidate, i.e. Trump, could be conveniently ‘lost in the mail.’”
    • The Facts: There is no evidence suggesting the existence of counterfeit mail-in ballots, nor is there evidence of Trump votes going missing.
    • TeaParty.org did not respond to an email from NewsGuard seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.

  • TheFederalist.com, an anonymously owned website that has repeatedly published false or misleading information in news and opinion stories.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Sept. 9, 2020, article that claimed that Democrats are “actively sabotaging the 2020 election by pushing ‘cheat-by-mail’ voter fraud.”
    • The Facts: Although voter fraud does occur, evidence shows that it is extremely rare. Although the Democratic Party has promoted increased mail-in voting in 2020, there is no evidence that Democrats are promoting fraud. The conservative Heritage Foundation maintains a voter fraud database documenting cases dating as far back as 1986 and, as of Oct. 20, 2020, had found a total 1,298 cases of voter fraud, with 208 involving absentee ballots. Amber McReynolds, CEO for the National Vote At Home Institute and Coalition, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology political science professor Charles Stewart III cited this data in an April 2020 op-ed for The Hill, stating that 143 of these absentee ballot cases resulted in criminal convictions. They wrote that “fraud using mailed ballots over the course of 20 years comes out to seven to eight cases per year, nationally,” adding that this rate represents “about 0.00006 percent of total votes cast.”
    • TheFederalist.com did not respond to an email from NewsGuard seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.

  • TheFederalistPapers.org, a conservative political website that has published poorly sourced and unsubstantiated claims to advance its views.
    •  Example of False Election Claim: Oct. 11, 2020, article that claimed that “60,000 mail ballots [were] unaccounted for in [a] Trump-heavy county.”
    • The Facts: 58,000 ballots in Pennsylvania’s Westmoreland County were sent out three days late, according to county election officials, but there is no evidence that the ballots were ever “unaccounted for,” as the issue was identified and solved in a timely manner. Officials blamed the error on the contractors responsible for sending out the ballots. The county discovered two days after the ballots were supposed to be sent that they had not yet been sent to voters, according to a report by local NBC affiliate WPXI.
    • TheFederalistPapers.org did not respond to an email from NewsGuard seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.

  • TheGatewayPundit.com, a conservative website that regularly publishes hoaxes, conspiracy theories, and unsubstantiated claims.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Oct. 9, 2020, article that claimed that “New Hampshire voters are receiving fake ballots in the mail,” which the site said is evidence of “MORE FRAUD.”
    • The Facts: The article included a photo that showed that New Hampshire voters did not, in fact, receive fake ballots. The unsolicited forms were absentee ballot applications, not actual ballots.
    • After writing to an email account associated with Gateway Pundit’s Facebook page, NewsGuard received a response from John Burns, an attorney, regarding a question about a different article on the site. He did not address NewsGuard’s question about its false story of New Hampshire voter fraud.

  • TheLeoTerrell.com, a site that covers U.S. politics from an undisclosed conservative, pro-Trump perspective. The site occasionally publishes false and unsubstantiated information.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Oct. 8, 2020, podcast that claimed: “In the great state of California, there were ballots sent to the same residence multiple times. Let me translate what I just said — thousands of ballots were sent to residents at the same address. Multiple ballots. So in other words, residents were getting two, three, four ballots. Ladies and gentlemen of America, that is reaping with fraud.”
    • The Facts: There have been reports from a number of California counties, including Los Angeles County, Sacramento County, and San Mateo County, of voters receiving multiple mail-in ballots, according to press accounts. However, there is no credible evidence to suggest that this is an indication of fraud.
      • KTTV, a Fox affiliate in Los Angeles, reported that the LA County Registrar’s office said that “voters may receive multiple ballots if they register more than once, but only one ballot will be counted.” The Sacramento Bee also reported that election officials said that once voters “return one ballot, all others are void.” Jim Irizarry, a San Mateo County election official, told ABC7 News in San Francisco that “the issuance of two ballots is a normal and customary process in every election.” Irizarry said that systems are in place to count only the first ballot to arrive from any voter.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to two messages sent to The LeoTerrell.com through a general feedback form on its Contact page, seeking comment on this false claim. A voicemail left at Terrell’s law office in Los Angeles also went unanswered.

  • TheNationalPulse.com, a conservative news site edited by former Breitbart U.K. editor Raheem Kassam. The site has published inaccurate and misleading articles and mixes news with opinion.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Sept. 1, 2020, article that stated: “WARNING: Democrat data firm admits ‘incredible’ Trump landslide will be flipped by mail-in votes emerging a week after Election Day,” adding that this situation is “eerily similar to [Nigel] Farage’s forewarning of how ‘dark art operatives in the Democrats’ are intent on ‘abusing’ mail-in ballots to secure a victory for Biden.”
    • The Facts: There is no evidence that Democrats are abusing mail-in voting to ensure that Biden wins the election. Further, any votes counted after Election Day will not “flip” the result from Election Day; rather, those votes will reveal the true winner, which will only be known once all ballots are counted.
    • TheNationalPulse.com did not respond to an email from NewsGuard seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.

  • TheRedElephants.com, a conservative news site that frequently publishes false and misleading content, including about the U.S. 2020 election.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 7, 2020 article that claimed that U.S. President Donald Trump “won the election on election night” and that “now, after many days of finding ballots, the media is claiming Joe Biden won the election.”
    • The Facts: On Nov. 7, 2020, four days after the U.S. presidential election and the same day the Red Elephants article was published, The Associated Press, CNN, and other major media outlets projected Democrat Joe Biden as the winner of the 2020 presidential election. While President Trump filed lawsuits in several states that challenged the results, he has not been projected the winner. As of Nov. 19, 2020, Biden had been awarded 290 electoral votes (270 electoral votes are required to win the presidential race), and approximately 79.6 million overall votes, to 232 electoral votes and approximately 73.6 million overall votes for President Trump, according to an ongoing count by The Associated Press.
    • The Red Elephants responded to an email NewsGuard sent to its general address, asking for specific questions about its site from NewsGuard, but then did not respond to a follow-up email seeking comment about this false claim.

  • ThinkAmericana.com, an anonymously operated conservative news site that has published false information and conspiracy theories, including about COVID-19.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 3, 2020, article claimed that “in North Carolina this weekend, Black Lives Matter showed up at a polling location on the last day of early voting,” on Oct. 31, 2020, and called activists’ appearance at a polling place in Graham, N.C., “voter intimidation.”
    • The Facts: There is no evidence that the Black Lives Matter protesters interacted with any voters. “activists were more than a block away from the polling site when the march ended,” according to The Associated Press, rather than “at a polling location,” as ThinkAmericana.com claimed. The protesters referenced in the article were part of a “march to the polls” event called “I Am Change.” The polling place was the final destination on the march, and the protesters had not passed it on the way.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with ThinkAmericana.com, seeking comment on this false claim.

  • TrendingPolitics.com, an anonymously owned conservative news site that has published misleading and inaccurate information.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Sept. 1, 2020, article, reposted from ConservativeBrief.com, that claimed that “50,000 ballots [were] TOSSED after official ‘altered’ them,” suggesting the existence of a massive voter fraud case in Iowa.
    • The Facts: The Associated Press reported that Iowa District Court Judge Ian Thornhill ordered Linn County, Iowa, to invalidate 50,000 requests for absentee ballots, not actual ballots. The judge ruled that the ballot request forms had been improperly filled in by the Linn County Auditor prior to being sent to voters. There were no illegal ballots submitted, and no one was charged with a crime. Voters whose requests for a mail-in ballot were rejected could apply again or they could vote in person.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email associated with TrendingPolitics.com seeking comment on the site’s publication of a false election claim.

  • UAFReport.com, a conservative website run by Will Johnson, a Republican activist and YouTuber, that has published false and misleading information and does not run corrections.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Sept. 28, 2020, article that claimed that Colorado sent “ballots to illegals and the dead.”
    • The Facts: Colorado did not send ballots to undocumented immigrants or to dead people. The state did send postcards reminding people to register to vote to at least a dozen undocumented immigrants and deceased people. But the postcards are not ballots, and in fact, they laid out the requirements for voting, including the qualification of U.S. citizenship, according to Denver CBS affiliate CBS4.  The state has two lists for sending unofficial election mail, like the postcard, and official mail, which only goes to registered voters. “I think the key is that the mailing to encourage potentially unregistered people to register is not the same mailing as our ballot mailing. Those are two separate universes,” Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold, a Democrat, told CBS4.
    • In a Twitter message to NewsGuard, UAFReport.com wrote that “NewsGuard is 100% Bias” and said that a NewsGuard report about election misinformation is “so anti-American.”

  • UncleSamsMisguidedChildren.com, a news site covering U.S. politics, the military, and law enforcement that has advanced false claims and is tied to the Oath Keepers, a far-right militia organization.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Aug 19, 2020, article that claimed that in California, “illegals are automatically registered to vote, but are not eligible to vote in the Presidential race, only local ones.”
    • The Facts: Non-citizens are not eligible to vote in California, or anywhere in the U.S. “To register to vote in California, you must be: A United States citizen and a resident of California,” the California Secretary of State’s website states. According to an April 2019 article in the Los Angeles Times, a new law allowing citizens to automatically register to vote when they get a driver’s license did result in Department of Motor Vehicle employees registering 1,500 ineligible people to vote, a mistake that was quickly rectified. Moreover, even in cases where noncitizens were mistakenly registered to vote, it remains illegal for them to cast a ballot.
    • In response to an email from NewsGuard inquiring about the site’s publication of a false election claim, an administrator from the site wrote in an unsigned email that “I am NOT a journalist and having you demand that I be one is egregious.” The email did not include a response to a question about the site’s publication of a false election claim. “Are you ‘guardians of the news’ or suppressing free speech? I submit that it is the latter,” the email stated. 

A similar claim also appeared on:

  • FrontPageMag.com, a conservative website that has published false news and conspiracy theories about Muslims and minorities, owned by a nonprofit that declares “the political left has declared war on America.”.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent an email addresses affiliated with FrontPageMag.com seeking comment on this false claim.
  • Ns2017.wordpress.com, a far-right French-language website, whose financing is not disclosed, that promotes anti-immigration views and publishes debunked conspiracy theories, including false claims about the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • Because the website does not provide any contact information, NewsGuard was unable to contact NS2017.wordpress.com to seek comment about the site’s publication of a false election claim.

  • UniteAmericaFirst.com, a conservative website run by Will Johnson, a Republican activist and YouTuber, that has published false and misleading information and does not run corrections.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 3 article, originally published on DJHJMedia.com, that claimed that Pennsylvania postal workers “hand over bundles of thousands of mail-in ballots,” which they “steam open” and turn in only “if it’s a Democrat vote.” It also stated that if the ballots had not been cast for Democrats, the postal workers “use a copied ballot filled in for Democrats, remove and replace the real ballot, and turn it in.”
    • The Facts: In August 2020, the New York Post published a story story titled, “Confessions of a voter fraud: I was a master at fixing mail-in ballots,” which cited an anonymous “top Democratic operative” who had claimed to have replaced mail-in ballots with counterfeits, and who said “sometimes postal employees are in on the scam.” The operative also claimed to have “led teams of fraudsters and mentored at least 20 operatives in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania — a critical 2020 swing state.” The UniteAmericaFirst.com article did not attribute any of its claims to the Post’s story, and added other claims, including that the postal workers it referenced were from Pennsylvania, and that they had handed over “thousands of mail-in ballots.”
    • In response to NewsGuard’s inquiry seeking comment about the false claim, Channon Johnson, the producer of the UniteAmericaFirst.com YouTube show, emailed NewsGuard excerpts from the New York Post story, and did not offer comment.

  • VoxNews.info, an Italian website that regularly publishes unsubstantiated claims to back anti-immigrant views.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 5, 2020, article, headlined “Fraud in the US, more votes than voters in Nevada,” claimed that a county in Nevada had more votes cast in the 2020 presidential election than the county’s total number of registered voters. The article stated: “There is only one explanation: either dead people or illegal people. And since in almost all the US states you don’t need a document to vote, especially by post, it’s easy to guess the answer.” To back this claim, the site posted a tweet by Tom Fitton, president at Judicial Watch, stating that “Judicial Watch analysis shows Clark County, NV, has a 102.7% voter registration rate.”
    • The Facts: It is inaccurate to claim that more people voted in Clark County than the number of registered voters. According to the Nevada official election website, 914,494 people voted in Clark County and the county had 1,263,391 registered voters. According to data provided by the Office of Nevada Secretary of State Barbara K. Cegavske, as of Nov. 6, 2020, the number of votes cast in the 2020 election was lower than the number of registered voters in the state: Nevada had 1,821,864 registered voters, 1,280,639 ballots cast, and 70.29% turnout.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.

  • WND.com, a hyperpartisan conservative news and commentary site that regularly promotes conspiracy theories and publishes false information.
    • Example of False Election Claim: Nov. 9, 2020, article that claimed that in the 2020 presidential election, “there was massive voter fraud and corrupt counting practices on a level that’s beyond quantifying based upon the scale of the cheating.” The article also claimed that “Not even Democrats and/or people in the Biden campaign believe he actually won,” adding, “The Biden camp enjoined with the Democrats and media are cheering that for the moment it appears the cheating has worked.”
    • The Facts: There is no evidence that there was “massive voter fraud” or “corrupt counting” in the 2020 presidential election, let alone at the large scale described by WND that could change the outcome of the election. A report published by the Organization of American States, an international organization that served as a nonpartisan election observer monitoring the U.S. election, did not find evidence of any irregularities or systematic fraud, The Wall Street Journal reported. The Associated Press reported that, contrary to claims by President Trump and other Republican officials, “Trump has not presented evidence that Americans had a dishonest election or that ‘illegal ballots’ shaped the result.”
      • In states where the margin between Donald Trump and Joe Biden is small and recounts are expected, election officials indicated that the recount will almost certainly not change the result of the election. For example, Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a Republican, stated: “Was there illegal voting? I am sure there was. And my office is investigating all of it. Does it rise to the numbers or margin necessary to change the outcome to where President Trump is given Georgia’s electoral votes? That is unlikely.” In response to the Trump campaign’s demands for a recount in Wisconsin, the bipartisan Wisconsin Elections Commission “says it is not aware of any irregularities,”  PBS reported.
      • As of Nov. 9, 2020, the Trump campaign had filed 12 lawsuits contesting election results and vote-counting procedures in Pennsylvania, Nevada, Michigan, Georgia, and Arizona, according to Time magazine. Eight of the lawsuits were dismissed or rejected for lack of evidence, or resolved by the parties; none are believed to have the potential to change the outcome of the election.
      • While voter fraud does occur, evidence indicates that it is rare. The conservative Heritage Foundation maintains a voter fraud database documenting cases dating to 1986;  as of Oct. 20, 2020, Heritage had found a total 1,298 cases of voter fraud, with 208 involving absentee ballots. Amber McReynolds, CEO for the National Vote At Home Institute and Coalition, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology political science professor Charles Stewart III cited this data in an April 2020 op-ed for The Hill stating that 143 of these absentee ballot cases resulted in criminal convictions. They wrote that “fraud using mailed ballots over the course of 20 years comes out to seven to eight cases per year, nationally,” adding that this rate represents “about 0.00006 percent of total votes cast.”
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to Joseph Farah, the site’s editor-in-chief, chairman, and CEO, seeking comment on this false claim.

Similar claims also appeared on:

  • Anti-Spiegel.ru, a pro-Russia site that focuses on debunking the news coverage of Germany’s top-circulating magazine, Der Spiegel. The site frequently promotes false claims and runs misleading headlines.
    • In response to an email from NewsGuard inquiring about this false claim, Anti-Spiegel’s owner, Thomas Röper, wrote in an article on the site, that the article in question “is the translation of a report from Russian television,” adding “you cannot ask the translator (in this case me) about the content of the translation, because the content was not written by the translator. So the addressee for the question of NewsGuard is not me, but the editor of the Russian television program ‘News of the Week.’ I am only the contact person when it comes to the correctness of the translation.”
  • ControInformazione.info, a news site that has published false claims and conspiracy theories, including about geopolitical issues and the COVID-19 pandemic.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.
  • Dreuz.info, a French-language website that covers French and international news, publishing false and misleading stories to advance far-right views.
    • In an email to NewsGuard in response to a question on the above article, an anonymous person (who signed the email Dreuz Info), said: “Groups like yours are not always what they pretend to be, even though fact-checking is officially your mission. The truth ministry in the classic novel 1984, by George Orwell comes to mind when reading you. The militarization of the fact-checking industry for political reasons discredits your endeavor: your fact-checks mostly target right-leaning media, which are considered with the pre-existing suspicion that they publish false information or favor conspiracies, while the left-wing media are considered with benevolence and a presupposed honesty, if they are examined at all.”
  • GlobalResearch.ca, the website of the nonprofit Canadian Centre for Research on Globalization, which has published false content, conspiracy theories, and pro-Russia propaganda.
    • NewsGuard emailed Michel Chossudovsky, the site’s founder and editor, seeking comment on this article but did not receive a response.
  • Newsmax.com, a conservative site that covers politics, culture, and health, and airs videos from its cable TV network. Newsmax has published false and unsubstantiated health claims, including about vaccines and COVID-19.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.
  • ReseauInternational.net,  a French website that frequently shares conspiracy theories and false international news, often drawn from sites known for publishing propaganda and misinformation.
    • ReseauInternational.net did not respond to a NewsGuard email and a message sent through its contact form seeking comment on this false claim.
  • RiposteLaique.com, a French-language far right, anti-Muslim website that regularly publishes conspiracy theories and unproven claims to advance its views.
    • In an email to NewsGuard in response to a request for comment on the above article, Lucette Jeanpierre, an author at RiposteLaique.com, said: “You are no more of a journalist than I am a nun, you are a propagandist who believes she is a progressive, capable of justifying the censorship of the president of the United States, by American colleagues, or on social media, without being bothered by it. You are an accomplice, with your stupid questions, of the most important electoral coup the world has ever seen, and that only deniers like you continue to deny. You are serving the globalists who own the major means of information, and you are on a mission to discredit websites that dare think differently, allowing yourself to ask inquisitive questions that you would never ask politically correct mainstream media. To sum up, you are part of the cast, and your role is closer to that of a little policewoman of the web than that of a journalist, which is honourable. People like you would have been very successful in all of the world totalitarian regimes. But I do not doubt that you live well of it, and that’s good for you.”
  • ShadOlsonShow.com, the website of conservative radio show host Shad Olson that has promoted false and unsubstantiated conspiracy theories.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.
  • SonsOfLibertyMedia.com, a political news site with a self-described “Christian, Biblical world-view” that has repeatedly published false stories, including claims that Barack Obama’s birth certificate is fake.
    • NewsGuard did not receive a response to an email sent to an email address affiliated with the site, seeking comment on this false claim.

Editor’s Note: A previous version of this article included Italian website LiberoQuotidiano.it. On Nov. 26, 2020, LiberoQuotidiano.it removed the article containing a false claim about the U.S. election and issued a correction. Therefore, the site has been removed from this page.